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eSocSci

What is eSocSci?

eSocSci connects New Zealand social scientists and their ideas across all disciplines, sectors and locations. The website uses academic blogging, networks, online seminars and econferences to facilitate this.

Who is eSocSci for?

eSocSci is for:

  • New academics to build networks and develop their ideas and research
  • Experienced academics to share their wisdom
  • Researchers and policy makes to discover and share ideas and research

Why do we need eSocSci?

In short, to facilitate disciplinary and sector crossover.  Locally and internationally, social scientists are called upon to tackle pressing social issues: how to respond to climate change, inequality, and development.  Sharing our intellectual capital across disciplines and sectors will position us to meet these challenges.  In New Zealand social scientists are spread among many disciplines, sectors and geographical locations.  eSocSci is a mechanism for crossing these boundaries.

What can I do on eSocSci?

  • Join a network and meet other social scientists
  • Create a network to reflect your area of interest
  • Share your ideas and research in our blogs
  • Learn about events and calls for papers
  • Share your events or calls
  • Contribute to network forums and get feedback on your work, ideas and questions
  • Share your advice and ideas on forums and in blog feedback
  • Attend our webinars, seminars and econferences
  • Get inspired and informed by our blog

How can I contribute to eSocSci?

  • Share your work in a blog post
  • Contribute to a network forum
  • Create a new network

How is eSocSci funded?

Isn’t free membership great? To pay for the small team of staff who run the eSocSci website, develop and edit blog entries, provide IT support, website design and development and run online seminars and econferences we rely on funding by subscription from universities and tertiary institutes in New Zealand who have a say in what we do for you.

Currently we receive funding from Massey University.

If your institution would like to support eSocSci (and we’d LOVE you to!), please contact Associate Professor Robin Peace or eSocSci Communications Coordinator Rhiannon Davies

Website Help

404- Page Not Showing

Sometimes a page wont load because we’ve edited it and the cookies in your browser need refreshing. Please send the URL in an email to our Communications Coordinator, who will fix the problem.

How do I Clear my Cache (Browser History)?

Sometimes a page wont load because we’ve edited it and the cookies in your browser need refreshing. Try this: How to Clear Your Cache

eSocSci Blog

What's the Difference Between a Forum and a Blog?

There is one blog on the eSocSci website which is open to the public to read and all eSocSci members are encouraged to send through posts (short articles). The blog can be accessed from the Home page.

Each network group has it’s own private forum. Forums are great for putting up a quick, informal question or comment to get feedback from your network. You can send us through forum posts to be used as blog posts too but we don’t actively share forum posts without permission because they’re private.

Why should I blog? - I'm really busy!!

Academic blogging is a relatively new concept in New Zealand but overseas it has become a vital tool for academics. In the U.S. 100% of Universities are using social media to communicate with their students.

Blogging is an essential tool to:

  • share research and ideas with a wider audience; both geographically and across disciplines
  • refine writing and publishing skills
  • encourage creative thinking
  • try out new ideas which are not ready for an academic publication
  • generate discourse, debate and feedback on an issue
  • bring ideas to the public that would not be suitable for formal publication
  • publish an idea or research while it is still topical and relevant rather than wait months or years for formal publication
  • share your personal experiences within academe with newer academics…
  • …and for newer academics to share with the rest of us how to work all this new technology!

What can I blog about?

Mewburn and Thomson (2013) list nine functions served by academic blogs, namely:

  1. self-help
  2. descriptions of academic practices
  3. offering technical advice
  4. critiquing academic culture
  5. disseminating research
  6. offering career advice
  7. recording personal reflections
  8. sharing information (e.g., about calls for papers or job vacancies)
  9. offering teaching advice

We have three suggested topics you may wish to blog about:

  • Inequality
  • Sustainability
  • The Value of Social Science

We’d also love to hear about:

  • Your research (whatever stage it’s at) into any fields that don’t fit into the above topics
  • How you are using social media to share your ideas, research and/or lectures
  • Interesting ways you’re using technology to share social science in New Zealand

Do you have Blogging Tips or Submission Guidelines?

Yes! Check our Blog Guidelines

Research

Do you have social science research papers on eSocSci?

eSocSci is a great place to blog your research – published or unpublished – and share your ideas, thoughts and work with the rest of New Zealands’ social scientists. We don’t, however, publish complete research papers as our aim is to complement other initiatives in the social sciences.  Other sites act as repositories for social science research – so we don’t do that here.  You can look at our Resources page for these websites.

Can I submit my research to eSocSci?

We don’t take full papers but we’d love to see a blog post about your work and you can include links to your research or publications in the post.

eSocSci aims to complement other initiatives in the social sciences.  Other sites act as repositories for social science research – so we don’t do that here.  You can look at our Resources page for these websites.

How can I see more of my field on eSocSci?

We want to see all fields of social sciences represented on eSocSci. If your field is underrepresented you could contribute a blog post (or several!) about your research or start a network (see below) and meet more academics in your field.

Still stuck? email us

Multiethnic People with Startup Business Talking in a Cafe

eSocSci Networks

How do the networks work?

Our networks are run by volunteer network leaders who decide how their network functions. Some are private and membership is by application to the network leader and some are public networks where anyone can join.   Information about how each network operates is on the networks page here.

I already belong to a lot of networks - why should I join?

eSocSci is different because it’s interdisciplinary and interinstitutional; our networks allow you to meet and collaborate with researchers and social scientists from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds from across the country and around the world.

How do I set up my own network?

  1. Have a look at some of the other networks and join a couple to get an idea of how they run and what they do.
  2. You may want to team up with a colleague/associate to share the management of the network
  3. Write down some ideas of what areas you want the network to cover and what areas it wont cover
  4. You can make the network:
  • Public (Anyone can join instantly)
  • Private (New members must contact you first and you’ll need to manually add them to the network)
  • Hidden (A private network which can’t be seen on the eSocSci website unless you’re a member)
  1. email Robin Peace or Rhiannon Davies at eSocSci with your ideas or for more information

Seminars

How do I get to a seminar? Can I attend a seminar from my computer?

We are currently using Zoom video conferencing which is an online forum. We encourage people to attend seminars from New Zealand universities’ meeting rooms (listed here) but you can also participate from your desktop anywhere in the world.

To register for a seminar or to enquire about meeting technology, please email Seminar Coordinator Melanie Milicich

Can I host a seminar on eSocSci if it doesn't fit with my network's theme?

Yes! Contact Melanie Milicich about hosting seminars with eSocSci for international visitors or seminar topics that don’t fit with your network theme. Even if you don’t belong to any of the networks in eSocSci we would love to host your presentation.

Can I host a seminar on eSocSci for an international vistor?

Yes! Contact Melanie Milicich about hosting seminars with eSocSci for international visitors or seminar topics that don’t fit with your network theme.

Can I host a seminar on eSocSci if I don't have a network?

Yes! Contact Melanie Milicich about hosting seminars with eSocSci.

Forums

How do the Forums Work?

Each network has it’s own private forum accessible to members only. It’s a place where you can start a conversation, continue a discussion started after a seminar or meeting, and post media such as videos, documents, audio files, images, etc.

What's the Difference Between a Forum and a Blog?

There is one blog on the eSocSci website which is open to the public to read and all eSocSci members are encouraged to send through posts (short articles). The blog can be accessed from the Home page.

Each network group has it’s own private forum. Forums are great for putting up a quick, informal question or comment to get feedback from your network. You can send us through forum posts to be used as blog posts too but we don’t actively share forum posts without permission because they’re private.

Still stuck? email us